Foods that Boost your Immune System12:

Pomegranate Juice

The ancient Egyptians were on to something when they used this colourful fruit to treat infections. So far, most modern research has focused on pomegranate extract, but the juice shows promise: It may help your body fight bacteria and several kinds of viruses, including the flu.

Pomegranate fruit is one of the most popular, nutritionally rich fruit with unique flavor, taste, and heath promoting characteristics. Together with sub-arctic pigmented berries and some tropical exotics such as mango, it too has novel qualities of functional foods, often called as “super fruits.”

Botanically, it is a small size fruit-bearing, deciduous tree belonging to the Lythraceae family, of genus: Punica. The tree is thought to have originated in the Persia and Sub-Himalayan foothills of Northern India. Scientific name: Punica granatum.

Health benefits of Pomegranate

  • The fruit is moderate in calories, holds about 83 calories per 100 grams; slightly more than that of in the apples. It contains no cholesterol or saturated fats.
  • It is a good source of soluble and insoluble dietary fibers; providing about 4 grams per 100 g (about 12% of RDA). Dietary fiber aid in smooth digestion and bowel movements.
  • Nutritionists recommend pomogranate in the diet for weight reduction and cholesterol controlling programs. Regular inclusion of fruits in the diet boosts immunity, improves circulation, and offers protection from cancers.
  • Certain ellagitannin compounds such as Granatin B, and Punicalagin are found abundantly in the pomegranate juice. Studies suggest that punicalagin and tannins can be effective in reducing heart-disease risk factors by scavenging harmful free radicals from the human body.
  • Total antioxidant strength of pomegranate fruit measured in terms of its oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) is 2341 µmol TE/100 g.
  • The fruit is an also good source of antioxidant vitamin-C, provides about 17% per 100 g of daily requirement. Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents by boosting immunity.
  • Regular consumption of pomegranate has also been found to be effective against prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), diabetes, and lymphoma.
  • Further, it is an also good source of many vital B-complex groups of vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), folates, pyridoxine and vitamin K, and minerals like calcium, copper, potassium, and manganese.

hCG Phase 3 and 4 Crunchy Chicken Salad

It’s that time of the year again when we want to shed our jackets and indulge in fresh salads. While I enjoy a classic Caesar, or a good romaine, I also like to make salads that are not found on everyday menus.

Serves 4

You’ll need:

3 cups shredded Chinese cabbage
3 cups shredded red cabbage
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup unsalted cashews
1/4 cup chopped chives (try cutting with scissors)
1 cup roughly chopped mint leaves
1 cup torn cilantro leaves
4 small red thai chilies, seeds removed and finely sliced (optional if you don’t like spice)
4 fully cooked chicken breasts, cut into slices

For the coconut lime dressing:

1 cup of coconut milk
2 tbsp of fish sauce
4 tbsp of lime juice
2 tbsp of coconut sugar

Combine cabbage, carrot, cashews, chives, mint, cilantro and chicken in a large bowl and toss gently to combine.

In a measuring cup, combine coconut milk, fish sauce, lime juice and sugar. Stir well to combine. Pour half the dressing over the salad and gently toss. Divide between plates and top with chilies. Add more dressing to taste.

I like to make a lot of dressing and keep some in fridge to dip veggies in or pour over rice, but you can half the dressing recipe if you want to. Beware of the chilies, as they are very spicy. After slicing them, wash your hands very well and don’t touch your eyes or nose. If you prefer a little less spice, sprinkle the finished salad with dried chili flakes instead.

Foods That Boost Your Immune System #11:

Chicken Soup
 
There’s hard science behind Grandma’s favorite cold remedy. Homemade chicken soup really can ease your symptoms and may help you get well sooner. What’s more, there’s a chemical in it called carnosine that can protect your body from the flu virus. 
Since colds are believed to be caused by viral infections in the upper respiratory tract, research has suggested the ingredients in the soup slows white blood cells from gathering in the lungs, therefore slowing the progress of irritating side effects, like coughing, sneezing, and a stuffy, runny nose.

Used in Ancient Times The idea that chicken soup, often dubbed the “Jewish penicillin,” has medicinal effects dates back to ancient times, but modern scientists have never fully deciphered the reasons.

Some doctors believe that the soup’s benefits are mainly psychosomatic, that it’s the ultimate comfort food. Others say the steaming hot soup clears congestion and provides the body with necessary hydration to flush out viral bugs.

Foods That Boost Your Immune System #10:

Garlic

This kitchen staple does more than punch up the flavor of food. Raw garlic can help beat skin infections thanks to its ability to fight bacteria, viruses, and fungi. To get the benefits, you have to use the real stuff, though, not garlic powder. A garlic supplement may even help lower your cholesterol.

Garlic is a plant in the Allium (onion) family.

It is closely related to onions, shallots and leeks.

It grows in many parts of the world and is a popular ingredient in cooking due to its strong smell and delicious taste.

However, throughout ancient history, the main use of garlic was for its health and medicinal properties.

Its use was well documented by all the major civilizations… including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and the Chinese.

Calorie for calorie, garlic is incredibly nutritious.

A 1 ounce (28 grams) serving of garlic contains:

  • Manganese: 23% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B6: 17% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin C: 15% of the RDA.
  • Selenium: 6% of the RDA.
  • Fiber: 1 gram.
  • Decent amounts of calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron and vitamin B1.

Garlic also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients. In fact, it contains a little bit of almost everything we need.

This is coming with 42 calories, with 1.8 grams of protein and 9 grams of carbs.

hCG Phase 3 and 4 Dairy-free Coconut Cream with Berries

Miss yogurt in the morning? Try these three delicious dairy-free options with berries and coconut flavor!

Ingredients

  • 100 ml coconut cream
  • 20 g fresh strawberries
  • 1 pinch vanilla extract
With Raspberries

  • 100 ml coconut cream
  • 20 g Fresh raspberries
  • 1 pinch vanilla extract
With Blueberries

  • 100 ml coconut cream
  • 50 g blueberries
  • 1 pinch vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Mix together with a stick blender.

Foods That Boost Your Immune System #9:

Broccoli

It’s easy to find at the grocery store, and it’s an immune-boosting basic. You’ll get plenty of nutrients that protect your body from damage. It has vitamins A and C, and the antioxidant glutathione. Add to any dish or top with some low-fat cheese to round out a side dish.

  • Broccoli can provide you with some special cholesterol-lowering benefits if you will cook it by steaming. The fiber-related components in broccoli do a better job of binding together with bile acids in your digestive tract when they’ve been steamed. When this binding process takes place, it’s easier for bile acids to be excreted, and the result is a lowering of your cholesterol levels. Raw broccoli still has cholesterol-lowering ability—just not as much.
  • Broccoli has a strong, positive impact on our body’s detoxification system, and researchers have recently identified one of the key reasons for this detox benefit. Glucoraphanin, gluconasturtiian, and glucobrassicin are 3 glucosinolate phytonutrients found in a special combination in broccoli. This dynamic trio is able to support all steps in body’s detox process, including activation, neutralization, and elimination of unwanted contaminants. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are the detox-regulating molecules made from broccoli’s glucosinolates, and they help control the detox process at a genetic level.
  • Broccoli may help us solve our vitamin D deficiency epidemic. When large supplemental doses of vitamin D are needed to offset deficiency, ample supplies of vitamin K and vitamin A help keep our vitamin D metabolism in balance. Broccoli has an unusually strong combination of both vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene) and vitamin K. For people faced with the need to rebuild vitamin D stores through vitamin D supplements, broccoli may be an ideal food to include in the diet.
  • Broccoli is a particularly rich source of a flavonoid called kaempferol. Recent research has shown the ability of kaempferol to lessen the impact of allergy-related substances on our body. This kaempferol connection helps to explain the unique anti-inflammatory benefits of broccoli, and it should also open the door to future research on the benefits of broccoli for a hypoallergenic diet.

 

hCG Phase 2 3 4 Pesto Chicken Casserole with Feta Cheese and Olives

A dish we can highly recommend, we have this one on a regular basis as it tastes amazing and is easy and quick to prepare.

An amazing chicken dish that is loved by people of all ages. All the way from Italy, so do enjoy this fab dish!

INGREDIENTS

  • 700 g chicken thighs or chicken breasts
  • 100 g red pesto or green pesto
  • 400 ml fat free cream
  • 120 ml pitted olives
  • 225 g feta cheese, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • Coconut oil, for frying

COOKING METHOD

    1. Preheat the oven to 200°C.
    1. Cut the chicken thighs or filLets into pieces. Season with salt and pepper and fry in coconut until golden brown.
    1. Mix pesto and heavy cream in a bowl.
    1. Place the fried chicken pieces in a baking dish together with olives, feta cheese and garlic. Add the pesto mix.
  1. Bake in oven for 20-30 minutes, until the dish has turned a nice color.

Serve with baby spinach or other leafy greens and your favourite low carb dressing.

Foods That Boost Your Immune System #8:

Tea

Feel free to choose white, green, or black. Each delivers disease-fighting polyphenols and flavonoids. These antioxidants seek out cell-damaging free radicals and destroy them. Caffeinated and decaf work equally well.

Tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world next to water, and can be found in almost 80% of all S.A. households. It is the only beverage commonly served hot or iced, anytime, anywhere, for any occasion.

Varieties

Black, Green, Oolong, Dark and White teas all come from the same plant, a warm-weather evergreen named Camellia sinensis. Differences among the five types of tea result from the various degrees of processing and the level of oxidization. Black tea is fully oxidized and Oolong teas are partially oxidized. After withering and rolling, the tea leaves undergo natural chemical reactions resulting in taste and color changes and that develop the teas distinguishing characteristics. Green & White teas are not oxidized after leaf harvesting. Oolong tea is midway between Black and Green teas in strength and color. Dark teas are fermented after manufacture.

Foods That Boost Your Immune System #8:

Tea

Feel free to choose white, green, or black. Each delivers disease-fighting polyphenols and flavonoids. These antioxidants seek out cell-damaging free radicals and destroy them. Caffeinated and decaf work equally well.

Tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world next to water, and can be found in almost 80% of all S.A. households. It is the only beverage commonly served hot or iced, anytime, anywhere, for any occasion.

Varieties

Black, Green, Oolong, Dark and White teas all come from the same plant, a warm-weather evergreen named Camellia sinensis. Differences among the five types of tea result from the various degrees of processing and the level of oxidization. Black tea is fully oxidized and Oolong teas are partially oxidized. After withering and rolling, the tea leaves undergo natural chemical reactions resulting in taste and color changes and that develop the teas distinguishing characteristics. Green & White teas are not oxidized after leaf harvesting. Oolong tea is midway between Black and Green teas in strength and color. Dark teas are fermented after manufacture.

Foods That Boost Your Immune System #7:

Spinach

You’ll find lots of nutrients in this “super food.” One of them is folate, which helps your body make new cells and repair DNA. It also boasts fiber, antioxidants such as vitamin C, and more. Eat spinach raw or lightly cooked to get the most benefit.

  • Bright, vibrant-looking spinach leaves are not only more appealing to the eye but more nourishing as well. Recent research has shown that spinach leaves that look fully alive and vital have greater concentrations of vitamin C than spinach leaves that are pale in color. The study authors suggest that the greater supply of vitamin C helps protect all of the oxygen-sensitive phytonutrients in the spinach leaves and makes them looking vibrant and alive.
  • Many people are concerned about the nutrient content of delicate vegetables (like baby spinach) when those vegetables are placed in clear plastic containers in grocery store display cases and continuously exposed to artificial lighting. One recent food study has shown that you don’t need to worry about the overall status of antioxidants in baby spinach that has been stored and displayed in this way. In this scientific study, the overall nutrient richness of the baby spinach when exposed to constant light was actually higher than the overall nutrient richness of baby spinach leaves kept in total darkness. The period of time in the study was 9 days, and the spinach was kept at 39°F/4°C (a temperature on the lower end of the scale for most home refrigerators). These findings are good news for anyone purchasing baby spinach in “ready-to-eat” containers.
  • One new category of health-supportive nutrients found in spinach is called “glycoglycerolipids.” Glycoclycerolipids are the main fat-related molecules in the membranes of light-sensitive organs in most plants. They’re indispensable for the process of photosynthesis carried out by plants. However, recent lab research in laboratory animals has shown that glycoglycerolipids from spinach can help protect the lining of the digestive tract from damage — especially damage related to unwanted inflammation. You can expect to see more studies about this exciting new category of molecules in spinach and its potential health benefits.
  • In a recent study on the relationship between risk of prostate cancer and vegetable intake — including the vegetables spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, mustard greens, turnip greens, collards, and kale — only spinach showed evidence of significant protection against the occurrence of aggressive prostate cancer. (“Aggressive prostate cancer” was defined as stage III or IV prostate cancer with a Gleason score of at least 7. Gleason scores are based on lab studies of prostate tissue and common tumor-related patterns.) The study authors did not speculate about specific substances in spinach that may have been involved in decreased prostate cancer risk. However, we know that certain unique anti-cancer carotenoids—called epoxyxanthophylls — are plentiful in spinach, even though they may not be as effectively absorbed as other carotenoids like beta-carotene and lutein. You can count on seeing future research on neoxanthin and violaxanthin — two anti-cancer epoxyxanthophylls that are found in plentiful amounts in the leaves of spinach.